Maya Lal

Solicitor

E: Maya@matthewgold.co.uk

Maya joined MG & Co in September 2017 and is based in the London office, working in the Public Law department. She has a profound sense of social justice and a real passion for advocating on behalf of the ordinary person to ensure their rights are protected.

Maya is a highly experienced solicitor with a particular interest and expertise in in public inquiries. She has been instructed on two leading and important inquiries: The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) and the Undercover Policing Inquiry (UCPI).

She also specialises in criminal law and domestic human rights law cases, with a breadth of experience encompassing cases involving museum and library closures, deprivation of citizenship, education and deportation of EEA national cases. She represented a claimant in the first decision on deprivation of citizenship to reach the Supreme Court, and successfully challenged the Secretary of State’s policy for determining applications for student loans from people without ‘settled’ status in the UK.

Maya’s sense of social justice stems from training and working at Lawrence & Co, specialising in criminal and extradition law. She has represented several clients facing extradition proceedings by challenging the International and European Arrest Warrants, which were not compliant with the ECHR. Maya is police station accredited and a duty solicitor. She regularly attends police stations and courts in her spare time, representing and advising suspects and vulnerable young people on a consultancy basis.

She is a member of the Law Society International Action Team, where she acts as a researcher, and she holds an LLM in Human Rights Law from Birkbeck University and LLB in Law with European Studies.

Before joining Matthew Gold & Co Maya was a founding member of the Public Interest Law Unit (PILU) at Lambeth Law Centre; a legal project with the primary focus of public law and issuing judicial reviews. While at PILU she specialised in domestic public law and worked on cases varying from education and immigration to international law and the deportation of EEA nationals.

Prior to founding the PILU Maya worked at a London based law firm specialising in international human rights law and public law. She was instructed on the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) and the Undercover Policing Inquiry (UCPI) whilst managing a heavy judicial review case load, considering decision makers are not in breach of laws made to protect fundamental rights and interests such as the Human Rights and Data Protection Acts 1998, the Equality Act 2010 and EU law.

Notable cases include:

Public inquiries

Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse

Maya was instructed on behalf of the Forde Park survivors during the IICSA and worked closely with SOIAS (Survivors of Organised and Institutional Abuse) and the Whiteflowers campaign as well as with Ben Emmerson QC to further the aims and objectives of the IICSA. Maya secured Forde Park as a case study within the first phase of the Inquiry, representing a paradigm example of how systemic abuse went undetected for decades.

The Undercover Policing Inquiry

The Inquiry is considering the illegal activities of undercover policing by the Special Demonstration Squad (Special Branch) and NPIOU. Maya represents Youth Against Racism (YRE) and former Labour MP Dave Nellist in the inquiry, and has also worked with the campaigning organisation Campaign Opposing Police Surveillance (COPS) applying pressure on the Inquiry to achieve the core participants demands

Public law

Al-Jedda v. Secretary of State for Home Department (SSHD) (representing the Claimant).

Maya represented the claimant before the Court of Appeal, in the first decision on the issue of deprivation of citizenship to reach the Supreme Court (Al-Jedda v Secretary of State for Home Department (SSHD)).

Nyoni v. Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (representing the claimant). This case concerned the refusal of a government agency to provide funding to students or aspiring students through the government’s student loan scheme. The claimant challenged the Secretary of State’s policy for determining applications for student loans from people without ‘settled’ status in the UK. The claimant was successful on the basis that her personal circumstances were such as to require the Secretary of State to treat her case as an exceptional one.

R (on the application of Hall) v Leicestershire County Council (2015) QBD (Admin) Judicial Review proceedings against Leicestershire County Council regarding the closure of Snibston Discovery Museum.

Criminal law

R v Wright  The Defendant was involved in a £4 million Cannabis factory empire which was set up in various locations in Kent using Vietnamese illegal immigrants to run the factories.  A basis of plea was negotiated which proceeded to a Newton Hearing. Consequently, the Defendant was sentenced to a term of imprisonment for 5 years and 8 months due to extensive mitigation.

R v Eyasu Mulugeta, Farhiya Mohamed Issa & other [2015] EWCA Crim 6.  Maya represented an Iranian national who left Iran due to his conversion to the Baha’i faith, successfully appealing his conviction, of using a false passport three years after he received the conviction. The appeal against conviction was quashed at the Court of Appeal.

R v Cheung [2009] EWCA Crim 2965 (20 August 2009). This was the first prosecution of the offence of ‘possession of extreme pornography’. The appeal against conviction was quashed at the Court of Appeal.

Maya Lal

Solicitor

E: Maya@matthewgold.co.uk

Maya joined MG & Co in September 2017 and is based in the London office, working in the Public Law department. She has a profound sense of social justice and a real passion for advocating on behalf of the ordinary person to ensure their rights are protected.

Maya is a highly experienced solicitor with a particular interest and expertise in in public inquiries. She has been instructed on two leading and important inquiries: The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) and the Undercover Policing Inquiry (UCPI).

She also specialises in criminal law and domestic human rights law cases, with a breadth of experience encompassing cases involving museum and library closures, deprivation of citizenship, education and deportation of EEA national cases. She represented a claimant in the first decision on deprivation of citizenship to reach the Supreme Court, and successfully challenged the Secretary of State’s policy for determining applications for student loans from people without ‘settled’ status in the UK.

Maya’s sense of social justice stems from training and working at Lawrence & Co, specialising in criminal and extradition law. She has represented several clients facing extradition proceedings by challenging the International and European Arrest Warrants, which were not compliant with the ECHR. Maya is police station accredited and a duty solicitor. She regularly attends police stations and courts in her spare time, representing and advising suspects and vulnerable young people on a consultancy basis.

She is a member of the Law Society International Action Team, where she acts as a researcher, and she holds an LLM in Human Rights Law from Birkbeck University and LLB in Law with European Studies.

Before joining MG & Co Maya was a founding member of the Public Interest Law Unit (PILU) at Lambeth Law Centre; a legal project with the primary focus of public law and issuing judicial reviews. While at PILU she specialised in domestic public law and worked on cases varying from education and immigration to international law and the deportation of EEA nationals.

Prior to founding the PILU Maya worked at a London based law firm specialising in international human rights law and public law. She was instructed on the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) and the Undercover Policing Inquiry (UCPI) whilst managing a heavy judicial review case load, considering decision makers are not in breach of laws made to protect fundamental rights and interests such as the Human Rights and Data Protection Acts 1998, the Equality Act 2010 and EU law.

Notable cases include:

Public inquiries

Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse

Maya was instructed on behalf of the Forde Park survivors during the IICSA and worked closely with SOIAS (Survivors of Organised and Institutional Abuse) and the Whiteflowers campaign as well as with Ben Emmerson QC to further the aims and objectives of the IICSA. Maya secured Forde Park as a case study within the first phase of the Inquiry, representing a paradigm example of how systemic abuse went undetected for decades.

The Undercover Policing Inquiry

The Inquiry is considering the illegal activities of undercover policing by the Special Demonstration Squad (Special Branch) and NPIOU. Maya represents Youth Against Racism (YRE) and former Labour MP Dave Nellist in the inquiry, and has also worked with the campaigning organisation Campaign Opposing Police Surveillance (COPS) applying pressure on the Inquiry to achieve the core participants demands

Public law

Al-Jedda v. Secretary of State for Home Department (SSHD) (representing the Claimant).

Maya represented the claimant before the Court of Appeal, in the first decision on the issue of deprivation of citizenship to reach the Supreme Court (Al-Jedda v Secretary of State for Home Department (SSHD)).

Nyoni v. Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (representing the claimant). This case concerned the refusal of a government agency to provide funding to students or aspiring students through the government’s student loan scheme. The claimant challenged the Secretary of State’s policy for determining applications for student loans from people without ‘settled’ status in the UK. The claimant was successful on the basis that her personal circumstances were such as to require the Secretary of State to treat her case as an exceptional one.

R (on the application of Hall) v Leicestershire County Council (2015) QBD (Admin) Judicial Review proceedings against Leicestershire County Council regarding the closure of Snibston Discovery Museum.

Criminal law

R v Wright  The Defendant was involved in a £4 million Cannabis factory empire which was set up in various locations in Kent using Vietnamese illegal immigrants to run the factories.  A basis of plea was negotiated which proceeded to a Newton Hearing. Consequently, the Defendant was sentenced to a term of imprisonment for 5 years and 8 months due to extensive mitigation.

R v Eyasu Mulugeta, Farhiya Mohamed Issa & other [2015] EWCA Crim 6.  Maya represented an Iranian national who left Iran due to his conversion to the Baha’i faith, successfully appealing his conviction, of using a false passport three years after he received the conviction. The appeal against conviction was quashed at the Court of Appeal.

R v Cheung [2009] EWCA Crim 2965 (20 August 2009). This was the first prosecution of the offence of ‘possession of extreme pornography’. The appeal against conviction was quashed at the Court of Appeal.