Najma Rasul

Consultant Senior Solicitor

E: najma@matthewgold.co.uk

Najma has extensive experience in Police law, Public law and Inquest Law and has represented clients at all levels in the domestic courts up to the Supreme Court and the European Court of Human Rights. She has been at the forefront of pioneering test cases, that have led to ground breaking legal changes, impacting policing practices and government policy.

Najma has been described in the Chambers and Partners legal directory as ““brilliant” someone who is “passionate about achieving justice, and not just settling a claim.” She is “known for her creative and meticulous approach to litigation……Sources identify her as an inspiration for her dedication and hard work.”

Najma represented the Appellant, Thomas Maughan in a historic landmark Supreme Court which resulted in the standard of proof for suicide and unlawful killing conclusions being reduced from the criminal standard (beyond reasonable doubt) to the civil standard (balance of probabilities). This is one of the most seminal decisions in Inquest law for over a decade. It will have wide reaching and profound implications for everyone involved in inquests, including the police, the Health and Safety Executive, the Crown Prosecution Service, public services, allocation of resources, future funding decisions and government policies on these preventable deaths.

Najma also successfully challenged the lawfulness of the indefinite retention of police custody photographs for those who been arrested but not charged or prosecuted. The court declared the policy unlawful, causing major changes to police practice and procedures, and government policies on data retention. She also acted for one of the Grenfell families in a proposed claim for judicial review of the Prime Minister’s failure to appoint additional panel members to the Grenfell Public Inquiry.

Najma has been involved in some of the most influential, high profile and complex cases within police and inquest law, such as: the Hillsborough Inquest, the Grenfell Public Inquiry, Undercover Policing, claims relating to protestors at the Knotts Radcliffe Power Stations, G20, Climate Camp and the European Court of Human Rights case on the lawfulness of protestors kettled in Oxford Circus May 2001

Najma specialises in civil litigation on behalf of people who have suffered wrongs at the hands of the criminal justice system. She has a particular interest in the lawfulness of policing practices, data retention, disclosure, state surveillance and discrimination.

Najma was one of solicitors to be awarded the ‘Outstanding Achievement Award’ at the Legal Aid Lawyer of the Year awards 2016. This was the first time the judges chose to recognise so many separate organisations in a single award category, reflecting the extraordinary nature of the Hillsborough case and the phenomenal work of all legal teams involved.

Najma was also one of the solicitors awarded the ‘Outstanding Achievement Award’ at the Modern Claims Awards 2017, which celebrates cross-industry talent and success. The award was given in recognition for the exceptional contribution the legal teams made in helping the families of Hillsborough victims obtain justice and truth about the 1989 tragedy.

Najma’s cases have appeared in national and local press, leading legal magazines and extensively written about by other professionals.  Najma has twice featured in the Law Society Gazette as “Lawyer in the News”.  The first, in relation to her work on litigation arising from the G20 protests, where protestors were kettled and assaulted by police officers (Dec 2009); and secondly in relation to the Supreme Court case of Maughan (Nov 2020).

Lawyer in the news: Najma Rasul, Matthew Gold & Co | Profile | Law Gazette

Najma joined Matthew Gold as a senior consultant solicitor in December 2017.

Najma worked on a part time basis at the Centre for Women’s Justice, a national charity providing individual and strategic litigation advice to female survivors and frontline support workers on all aspects of the criminal justice system (July – Nov 2020).

Prior to joining Mathew Gold, Najma was an Associate at Bindmans LLP in the Actions Against the Police and State Bodies Department (2007 –2017).

Najma established and developed the Prison Law Department at a leading firm in the North (March 2006 – Dec 2007).

Najma qualified and worked as a solicitor at Bhatt Murphy Solicitors (Sept 2004 – Sept 2006).

Before qualifying as a solicitor, Najma worked as a senior caseworker at a national voluntary orgainsation called the Centre for Corporate Accountability. She advised and represented injured workers and families bereaved from work-related deaths on investigation and prosecution issues. She was also involved in drafting policy documents on issues relating to health and safety, corporate manslaughter, directors’ liabilities, and campaigning to improve the safety of workers by holding companies and directors to account (2002 – 2004).

Professional Membership: Najma is a member of the Law Society; Inquest Lawyers Group; the Human Rights Lawyers Association; the Police Action Lawyers Group; and Liberty.

Professional Positions: Najma was a Director on the Board at the Centre for Corporate Accountability (June 2004 – March 2009) and a Director on the Board at Womens Aid, Leeds (2000 – 2002)

Najma has expertise on all aspects of Police Law, Public Law, Inquest Law and Public Inquiries. She specialises in the following types of cases:

  • Civil claims for compensation against the police, the Home Office, the Crown Prosecution Service and local authorities
  • Public law challenging decisions by public bodies, ranging from complaints, requests to review decisions under the Victims Right to Review scheme and judicial review procee
  • Inquests into workplace deaths and deaths in state custody
  • Public Inquires

Najma’s notable cases include:

Public Law cases

R (Maughan) v HM Senior Coroner for Oxfordshire and others [2020] UKSC Civ 809 – 13 November 2020: The Supreme Court decided that the standard of proof for all conclusions at an inquest, including suicide and unlawful killing, is the balance of probabilities. Before the Maughan case, the standard of proof for suicide and unlawful killing conclusions had been the criminal standard – beyond reasonable doubt. Now the same standard of proof applies to all inquest conclusions.

R (RMC & FJ) v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis and Others [2012] EWHC 1681 (Admin):  successfully represented RM challenging the national police guidance and decision by the police to keep her custody photographs on the Police National Database indefinitely, even though she had not been charged. The court found that the government guidance and police policy to store all custody photographs of individuals who had been arrested but not charged, was a breach of their rights to privacy under Article 8 of the Human Rights Act and therefore unlawful. The ruling resulted new guidance, changes in police practice and the introduction of a new system for managing the deletion and retention of personal data.

SK v Thames Valley Police (2020): Najma represented SK through the Victims Right to Review Scheme and in a proposed judicial review claim that raised important issues around the correct application of the law on corroboration in respect of sexual offences, discrimination, and failure by the police to comply with their duties under Article 3 of the Human Rights Act in carrying out effective investigations into serious sexual offences. The challenge resulted in the police re-opening the criminal investigation and making further enquires.

Richard Holness v Independent Police Complaints Commission and Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis CO/14303/2009: successfully challenged the independent police complaints system for failure to carry out an effective and independent complaint investigation. Mr Holness was seriously assaulted by 6 police officers and then unlawfully arrested and maliciously prosecuted. The challenge resulted in a re-investigation and misconduct proceedings being brought against the police officers.

European Court of Human Rights

Lowenthal and O’Shea v UK (March 2012):  the court was asked to consider the lawfulness of the decision by the police to detain by-standers during a policing operation which resulted in hundreds of protestors being kettled in Oxford Circus on 1 May 2001. The court found that the detention was lawful

Undercover cop cases

Various civil claims from the discovery that Mark Kennedy and other undercover cops had infiltrated protest groups around the country and engaged in unlawful sexual relationships with protestors.

Public Inquiry into the Grenfell Tower Fire

Najma represented families and survivors from the Grenfell Tower fire. She also acted for one of the Grenfell families in a proposed judicial review claim of the Prime Minister, Theresa May’s failure to appoint additional panel members to the Grenfell Public Inquiry. In response to pre-action correspondence the Prime Minister, confirmed that she would review her decision and give due regard to her Public Sector Equality Duty.

Hillsborough Inquest

Najma represented Joan Hope, the mother of 18 year old John McBrien in relation to the inquest into his death. John was one of 96 people who was tragically crushed to death at the Hillsborough Stadium, during the FA cup semi final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest on 15 April 1989. The Inquest started on 31 March 2014 and finished on 26 April 2016. It was the longest running inquest in English legal history and found that the supporters were unlawfully killed due to grossly negligent failures by police and ambulance services to fulfil their duty of care to the supporters. The inquest also found that the design of the stadium contributed to the crush, and that supporters were not to blame for the dangerous conditions.

 Civil Claims

DM – v – (1) Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (2) Crown Prosecution Service:  Successfully represented DM in a novel and complex case involving breach of his rights under Article 3 and 8 of the Human Rights Act 1998 and the Data Protection Act 1998 arising out of the collapse of the criminal prosecution against his abuser and for loss of his personal data. DM reported historical child sexual abuse allegations against his PE teacher to the police.  Although DM’s abuser was charged, the police and Crown Prosecution Service repeatedly failed to comply with court directions resulting in the judge dismissing the case for abuse of process. DM received £25,000 damages.

Franklyn Zorokong v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (2017): civil claim for damages for false imprisonment, racially aggravated assault and battery of a vulnerable black man, who was arrested for filming the police arresting people inside his local pub on his mobile phone.  He received £35,000 compensation and the police officers were subject to disciplinary proceedings.

MA v Secretary of State for the Home Department (2016):  civil claim against the Home Office for the unlawful detention of a minor who had leave to remain in the UK. MA was awarded £35,000 damages for unlawful detention and psychiatric damage.

JM v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (2016): civil claim and representation at the police disciplinary hearing against the Commissioner of police for the Metropolis. JM was the victim of a sexual assault on a night bus. Minutes later 2 police officers boarded the bus but failed to catch her attacker. The police failed to carry out an effective article 3 compliant investigation. The police officers were disciplined and JM received undisclosed damages.

AT v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (2015): undisclosed damages obtained for assault and battery, false imprisonment and malicious prosecution. AT had suffered serious injuries after being unlawfully arrested, restrained and tasered 5 times. He was subsequently charged with assaulting the police officers and was found not guilty by a Crown Court judge.

Gary Doolan v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis – 8CL03416 (2014): successfully represented Mr Doolan in a civil claim for unlawful arrest, false imprisonment, assault and battery and malicious prosecution. Mr Doolan was seriously assaulted leaving him with a permanent neuralgic pain in his left thigh, where he was repeatedly stuck by batons, which significantly impacted his personal and professional life. He received undisclosed damages and an apology.

DC v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (Claim No. 2YJ64649 – 2014): a young black man suffered a fractured eye socket, burn injuries to his arms and wrists, bruising and broken ribs following an unlawful stop and search and assault by 6 TSG officers in South London and maliciously prosecuted. Received £50,000 damages and an apology for assault and battery; false imprisonment and malicious prosecution.

AM and AR v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (Claim Number:  2YJ64740 – 2015): father and son were seriously assaulted by plain clothed police officers, who fled the scene after they realised that they had made a mistake and got the wrong people. AM r suffered a fractured arm and bruising to his body having been kicked and punched. His son, AR suffered a black eye. Both suffered post traumatic shock arising out of the incident. AM received £45,000 and AR received £10,000 damages and an apology.

Represented Brixton indie band (2009): The Thirst, Brixton Indie Band were arrested at gunpoint after a gig on 21 November 2009 by Staffordshire Police and held in police cells for fifteen hours by police. A week later the police admitted that they had got it wrong. Significant damages obtained, including destruction of DNA data, fingerprints and photographs and a public apology.

Terrorism related cases

Manchester Arena Terror attack: Najma was representing Salman Abdi, a 23 year old trainee pilot who was arrested in West Sussex in connection with the inquiry into the Manchester Ariana Grande Concert bombing, May 22, 2017).

Prevent Strategy: Najma successfully represented GM and his family in a proposed discrimination claim after their 13 year old son AM was referred to the police by his school under the controversial Government Prevent Strategy – Protecting children from radicalisation: the prevent duty imposed on schools.

Stop and Search

PI v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (2014): civil claim for £10,000 for false imprisonment, assault and battery and malicious prosecution arising out of the unlawful stop and search powers used by the police under section 44 Terrorism Act 2000, which the ECHR had ruled were unlawful and were being disproportionately being used against black and ethnic minorities.

Whistleblowing and rendition

Derek Pasquill v Secretary of State for the Home Department (2014) and others: Represented Derek Pasquill, aged 50 in a potential civil claim for misfeasance and malicious prosecution against the Government arising out of his arrest, detention and subsequent prosecution for alleged breaches of the Official Secrets Act. He was accused of leaking confidential documents between 2005 and 2006 to the New Statesman and the Observer about the government’s attitude to secret CIA rendition flights and involvement with Radical Islamists. See press links here.

Abdel Salam Hassan – Challenging the adequacy of the criminal investigation to ensure it was compliant with Article 3 of the Human Rights Act (2010): Represented the family of Mr Abdel Salam, 56, who was found by neighbours outside his home in Lewisham, having been stabbed in the leg. The victim volunteered at the REDRESS charity, a human rights organisation which supports survivors of torture. He was a renowned lawyer who played a leading role in the struggle for human rights and justice in Sudan over the last three decades.

Protest related work

G20 cases: Najma is best known for her work representing protestors following the G20 protests (2009).  She successfully represented several protestors who had been unlawfully assaulted by the police.

JM v Chief Constable Kent Police (2010): undisclosed damages for unlawful stop and search, assault and battery, malicious prosecution and an apology. JM was unlawfully stopped and searched, falsely imprisoned and then subjected to draconian bail conditions which prevented him from returning to the Climate Change Camp site at Kingsnorth Power Station. He was then maliciously prosecuted by Kent Police.

Cost cases

Neiring v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (CD 0803096) 21 July 2009 (Senior Court Costs Office): Costs associated with the Claimant’s involvement in the police complaint, the inquest and dealing with the Crown Prosecution Service are recoverable in principle, subject to the normal rules on proportionality.

Dissi v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (4CL04690) 28 Sept 2008 (Senior Court Costs Office): Costs associated with the Claimant’s involvement in the independent Police Complaints Commission and with the Crown Prosecution Service are recoverable in principle, subject to the normal rules on proportionality.

Najma Rasul

Consultant Senior Solicitor

E: najma@matthewgold.co.uk

Najma has extensive experience in Police law, Public law and Inquest Law and has represented clients at all levels in the domestic courts up to the Supreme Court and the European Court of Human Rights. She has been at the forefront of pioneering test cases, that have led to ground breaking legal changes, impacting policing practices and government policy.

Najma has been described in the Chambers and Partners legal directory as ““brilliant” someone who is “passionate about achieving justice, and not just settling a claim.” She is “known for her creative and meticulous approach to litigation……Sources identify her as an inspiration for her dedication and hard work.”

Najma represented the Appellant, Thomas Maughan in a historic landmark Supreme Court which resulted in the standard of proof for suicide and unlawful killing conclusions being reduced from the criminal standard (beyond reasonable doubt) to the civil standard (balance of probabilities). This is one of the most seminal decisions in Inquest law for over a decade. It will have wide reaching and profound implications for everyone involved in inquests, including the police, the Health and Safety Executive, the Crown Prosecution Service, public services, allocation of resources, future funding decisions and government policies on these preventable deaths.

Najma also successfully challenged the lawfulness of the indefinite retention of police custody photographs for those who been arrested but not charged or prosecuted. The court declared the policy unlawful, causing major changes to police practice and procedures, and government policies on data retention. She also acted for one of the Grenfell families in a proposed claim for judicial review of the Prime Minister’s failure to appoint additional panel members to the Grenfell Public Inquiry.

Najma has been involved in some of the most influential, high profile and complex cases within police and inquest law, such as: the Hillsborough Inquest, the Grenfell Public Inquiry, Undercover Policing, claims relating to protestors at the Knotts Radcliffe Power Stations, G20, Climate Camp and the European Court of Human Rights case on the lawfulness of protestors kettled in Oxford Circus May 2001

Najma specialises in civil litigation on behalf of people who have suffered wrongs at the hands of the criminal justice system. She has a particular interest in the lawfulness of policing practices, data retention, disclosure, state surveillance and discrimination.

Najma was one of solicitors to be awarded the ‘Outstanding Achievement Award’ at the Legal Aid Lawyer of the Year awards 2016. This was the first time the judges chose to recognise so many separate organisations in a single award category, reflecting the extraordinary nature of the Hillsborough case and the phenomenal work of all legal teams involved.

Najma was also one of the solicitors awarded the ‘Outstanding Achievement Award’ at the Modern Claims Awards 2017, which celebrates cross-industry talent and success. The award was given in recognition for the exceptional contribution the legal teams made in helping the families of Hillsborough victims obtain justice and truth about the 1989 tragedy.

Najma’s cases have appeared in national and local press, leading legal magazines and extensively written about by other professionals.  Najma has twice featured in the Law Society Gazette as “Lawyer in the News”.  The first, in relation to her work on litigation arising from the G20 protests, where protestors were kettled and assaulted by police officers (Dec 2009); and secondly in relation to the Supreme Court case of Maughan (Nov 2020).

Lawyer in the news: Najma Rasul, Matthew Gold & Co | Profile | Law Gazette

Najma joined Matthew Gold as a senior consultant solicitor in December 2017.

Najma worked on a part time basis at the Centre for Women’s Justice, a national charity providing individual and strategic litigation advice to female survivors and frontline support workers on all aspects of the criminal justice system (July – Nov 2020).

Prior to joining Mathew Gold, Najma was an Associate at Bindmans LLP in the Actions Against the Police and State Bodies Department (2007 –2017).

Najma established and developed the Prison Law Department at a leading firm in the North (March 2006 – Dec 2007).

Najma qualified and worked as a solicitor at Bhatt Murphy Solicitors (Sept 2004 – Sept 2006).

Before qualifying as a solicitor, Najma worked as a senior caseworker at a national voluntary orgainsation called the Centre for Corporate Accountability. She advised and represented injured workers and families bereaved from work-related deaths on investigation and prosecution issues. She was also involved in drafting policy documents on issues relating to health and safety, corporate manslaughter, directors’ liabilities, and campaigning to improve the safety of workers by holding companies and directors to account (2002 – 2004).

Professional Membership: Najma is a member of the Law Society; Inquest Lawyers Group; the Human Rights Lawyers Association; the Police Action Lawyers Group; and Liberty.

Professional Positions: Najma was a Director on the Board at the Centre for Corporate Accountability (June 2004 – March 2009) and a Director on the Board at Womens Aid, Leeds (2000 – 2002)

Najma has expertise on all aspects of Police Law, Public Law, Inquest Law and Public Inquiries. She specialises in the following types of cases:

  • Civil claims for compensation against the police, the Home Office, the Crown Prosecution Service and local authorities
  • Public law challenging decisions by public bodies, ranging from complaints, requests to review decisions under the Victims Right to Review scheme and judicial review procee
  • Inquests into workplace deaths and deaths in state custody
  • Public Inquires

Najma’s notable cases include:

Public Law cases

R (Maughan) v HM Senior Coroner for Oxfordshire and others [2020] UKSC Civ 809 – 13 November 2020: The Supreme Court decided that the standard of proof for all conclusions at an inquest, including suicide and unlawful killing, is the balance of probabilities. Before the Maughan case, the standard of proof for suicide and unlawful killing conclusions had been the criminal standard – beyond reasonable doubt. Now the same standard of proof applies to all inquest conclusions.

R (RMC & FJ) v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis and Others [2012] EWHC 1681 (Admin):  successfully represented RM challenging the national police guidance and decision by the police to keep her custody photographs on the Police National Database indefinitely, even though she had not been charged. The court found that the government guidance and police policy to store all custody photographs of individuals who had been arrested but not charged, was a breach of their rights to privacy under Article 8 of the Human Rights Act and therefore unlawful. The ruling resulted new guidance, changes in police practice and the introduction of a new system for managing the deletion and retention of personal data.

SK v Thames Valley Police (2020): Najma represented SK through the Victims Right to Review Scheme and in a proposed judicial review claim that raised important issues around the correct application of the law on corroboration in respect of sexual offences, discrimination, and failure by the police to comply with their duties under Article 3 of the Human Rights Act in carrying out effective investigations into serious sexual offences. The challenge resulted in the police re-opening the criminal investigation and making further enquires.

Richard Holness v Independent Police Complaints Commission and Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis CO/14303/2009: successfully challenged the independent police complaints system for failure to carry out an effective and independent complaint investigation. Mr Holness was seriously assaulted by 6 police officers and then unlawfully arrested and maliciously prosecuted. The challenge resulted in a re-investigation and misconduct proceedings being brought against the police officers.

European Court of Human Rights

Lowenthal and O’Shea v UK (March 2012):  the court was asked to consider the lawfulness of the decision by the police to detain by-standers during a policing operation which resulted in hundreds of protestors being kettled in Oxford Circus on 1 May 2001. The court found that the detention was lawful

Undercover cop cases

Various civil claims from the discovery that Mark Kennedy and other undercover cops had infiltrated protest groups around the country and engaged in unlawful sexual relationships with protestors.

Public Inquiry into the Grenfell Tower Fire

Najma represented families and survivors from the Grenfell Tower fire. She also acted for one of the Grenfell families in a proposed judicial review claim of the Prime Minister, Theresa May’s failure to appoint additional panel members to the Grenfell Public Inquiry. In response to pre-action correspondence the Prime Minister, confirmed that she would review her decision and give due regard to her Public Sector Equality Duty.

Hillsborough Inquest

Najma represented Joan Hope, the mother of 18 year old John McBrien in relation to the inquest into his death. John was one of 96 people who was tragically crushed to death at the Hillsborough Stadium, during the FA cup semi final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest on 15 April 1989. The Inquest started on 31 March 2014 and finished on 26 April 2016. It was the longest running inquest in English legal history and found that the supporters were unlawfully killed due to grossly negligent failures by police and ambulance services to fulfil their duty of care to the supporters. The inquest also found that the design of the stadium contributed to the crush, and that supporters were not to blame for the dangerous conditions.

 Civil Claims

DM – v – (1) Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (2) Crown Prosecution Service:  Successfully represented DM in a novel and complex case involving breach of his rights under Article 3 and 8 of the Human Rights Act 1998 and the Data Protection Act 1998 arising out of the collapse of the criminal prosecution against his abuser and for loss of his personal data. DM reported historical child sexual abuse allegations against his PE teacher to the police.  Although DM’s abuser was charged, the police and Crown Prosecution Service repeatedly failed to comply with court directions resulting in the judge dismissing the case for abuse of process. DM received £25,000 damages.

Franklyn Zorokong v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (2017): civil claim for damages for false imprisonment, racially aggravated assault and battery of a vulnerable black man, who was arrested for filming the police arresting people inside his local pub on his mobile phone.  He received £35,000 compensation and the police officers were subject to disciplinary proceedings.

MA v Secretary of State for the Home Department (2016):  civil claim against the Home Office for the unlawful detention of a minor who had leave to remain in the UK. MA was awarded £35,000 damages for unlawful detention and psychiatric damage.

JM v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (2016): civil claim and representation at the police disciplinary hearing against the Commissioner of police for the Metropolis. JM was the victim of a sexual assault on a night bus. Minutes later 2 police officers boarded the bus but failed to catch her attacker. The police failed to carry out an effective article 3 compliant investigation. The police officers were disciplined and JM received undisclosed damages.

AT v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (2015): undisclosed damages obtained for assault and battery, false imprisonment and malicious prosecution. AT had suffered serious injuries after being unlawfully arrested, restrained and tasered 5 times. He was subsequently charged with assaulting the police officers and was found not guilty by a Crown Court judge.

Gary Doolan v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis – 8CL03416 (2014): successfully represented Mr Doolan in a civil claim for unlawful arrest, false imprisonment, assault and battery and malicious prosecution. Mr Doolan was seriously assaulted leaving him with a permanent neuralgic pain in his left thigh, where he was repeatedly stuck by batons, which significantly impacted his personal and professional life. He received undisclosed damages and an apology.

DC v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (Claim No. 2YJ64649 – 2014): a young black man suffered a fractured eye socket, burn injuries to his arms and wrists, bruising and broken ribs following an unlawful stop and search and assault by 6 TSG officers in South London and maliciously prosecuted. Received £50,000 damages and an apology for assault and battery; false imprisonment and malicious prosecution.

AM and AR v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (Claim Number:  2YJ64740 – 2015): father and son were seriously assaulted by plain clothed police officers, who fled the scene after they realised that they had made a mistake and got the wrong people. AM r suffered a fractured arm and bruising to his body having been kicked and punched. His son, AR suffered a black eye. Both suffered post traumatic shock arising out of the incident. AM received £45,000 and AR received £10,000 damages and an apology.

Represented Brixton indie band (2009): The Thirst, Brixton Indie Band were arrested at gunpoint after a gig on 21 November 2009 by Staffordshire Police and held in police cells for fifteen hours by police. A week later the police admitted that they had got it wrong. Significant damages obtained, including destruction of DNA data, fingerprints and photographs and a public apology.

Terrorism related cases

Manchester Arena Terror attack: Najma was representing Salman Abdi, a 23 year old trainee pilot who was arrested in West Sussex in connection with the inquiry into the Manchester Ariana Grande Concert bombing, May 22, 2017).

Prevent Strategy: Najma successfully represented GM and his family in a proposed discrimination claim after their 13 year old son AM was referred to the police by his school under the controversial Government Prevent Strategy – Protecting children from radicalisation: the prevent duty imposed on schools.

Stop and Search

PI v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (2014): civil claim for £10,000 for false imprisonment, assault and battery and malicious prosecution arising out of the unlawful stop and search powers used by the police under section 44 Terrorism Act 2000, which the ECHR had ruled were unlawful and were being disproportionately being used against black and ethnic minorities.

Whistleblowing and rendition

Derek Pasquill v Secretary of State for the Home Department (2014) and others: Represented Derek Pasquill, aged 50 in a potential civil claim for misfeasance and malicious prosecution against the Government arising out of his arrest, detention and subsequent prosecution for alleged breaches of the Official Secrets Act. He was accused of leaking confidential documents between 2005 and 2006 to the New Statesman and the Observer about the government’s attitude to secret CIA rendition flights and involvement with Radical Islamists. See press links here.

Abdel Salam Hassan – Challenging the adequacy of the criminal investigation to ensure it was compliant with Article 3 of the Human Rights Act (2010): Represented the family of Mr Abdel Salam, 56, who was found by neighbours outside his home in Lewisham, having been stabbed in the leg. The victim volunteered at the REDRESS charity, a human rights organisation which supports survivors of torture. He was a renowned lawyer who played a leading role in the struggle for human rights and justice in Sudan over the last three decades.

Protest related work

G20 cases: Najma is best known for her work representing protestors following the G20 protests (2009).  She successfully represented several protestors who had been unlawfully assaulted by the police.

JM v Chief Constable Kent Police (2010): undisclosed damages for unlawful stop and search, assault and battery, malicious prosecution and an apology. JM was unlawfully stopped and searched, falsely imprisoned and then subjected to draconian bail conditions which prevented him from returning to the Climate Change Camp site at Kingsnorth Power Station. He was then maliciously prosecuted by Kent Police.

Cost cases

Neiring v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (CD 0803096) 21 July 2009 (Senior Court Costs Office): Costs associated with the Claimant’s involvement in the police complaint, the inquest and dealing with the Crown Prosecution Service are recoverable in principle, subject to the normal rules on proportionality.

Dissi v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (4CL04690) 28 Sept 2008 (Senior Court Costs Office): Costs associated with the Claimant’s involvement in the independent Police Complaints Commission and with the Crown Prosecution Service are recoverable in principle, subject to the normal rules on proportionality.