Judicial Review

At Matthew Gold & Co our lawyers have a wealth of experience in acting for claimants in public law and judicial review challenges. Our team is recommended by Legal 500 for our ‘wide range’ of public law work.

Public law and in particular judicial review (FAQs) is the legal mechanism for challenging decisions taken by public bodies. It is one of the ways in which a public body can be held to account for its actions.

Our solicitors have extensive experience of bringing successful judicial review and other public law claims in a broad range of areas and against a wide range of public bodies.

This includes challenging:

  • Crown Prosecution Service failure to charge police officers
  • Independent  Police Complaints Commission decisions to uphold police complaints
  • Awards of compensation by the Independent Assessor
  • Refusal to provide public funding
  • Cuts to care services
  • The disclosure of personal information by the police and local authorities
  • NHS charging decisions
  • Challenges to student fees regulations
  • The refusal of local authorities to provide support to destitute migrant families

 

We also provide training and advice to charities and civil society organisations on a number of public law matters.

At Matthew Gold & Co, we are fully equipped to provide the specialist advice required to bring a claim for Judicial Review.

FAQs for Judicial Review

How do you use public law to challenge the decisions of public bodies?

Public bodies routinely make decisions that have a profound effect on the lives of many ordinary people.

For example, the police may retain or disclose personal data, a local authority may decide that a primary school should close or a government department may pass new laws restricting a person’s entitlement to welfare benefits.

Public law, and in particular judicial review, is the legal mechanism for challenging decisions taken by public bodies. It is one of the ways in which a public body can be held to account for its actions. If you or others in your community have been negatively affected by a public body’s decision then it may be possible to challenge that decision by way of “judicial review”.

In an application for judicial review a court will look at the decision made by the public body and decide whether or not that decision was taken lawfully. If the court concludes that the public body’s action was unlawful then there are a range of options available to the court, including ordering that the original decision should be ‘quashed’ and the public body should take the decision again.

Timeframe for bringing a claim for judicial review

If you think you may have a claim for judicial review it is very important that you act quickly.

In general a claim for judicial review must be brought promptly; within six weeks or three months depending on the type of decision being challenged.

Sometimes acting promptly will mean acting very quickly indeed. You should seek immediate legal advice if you are contemplating a judicial review.

Judicial Review

At Matthew Gold & Co our lawyers have a wealth of experience in acting for claimants in public law and judicial review challenges. Our team is recommended by Legal 500 for our ‘wide range’ of public law work.

Public law and in particular judicial review (FAQs) is the legal mechanism for challenging decisions taken by public bodies. It is one of the ways in which a public body can be held to account for its actions.

Our solicitors have extensive experience of bringing successful judicial review and other public law claims in a broad range of areas and against a wide range of public bodies.

This includes challenging:

  • Crown Prosecution Service failure to charge police officers
  • Independent  Police Complaints Commission decisions to uphold police complaints
  • Awards of compensation by the Independent Assessor
  • Refusal to provide public funding
  • Cuts to care services
  • The disclosure of personal information by the police and local authorities
  • NHS charging decisions
  • Challenges to student fees regulations
  • The refusal of local authorities to provide support to destitute migrant families

 

We also provide training and advice to charities and civil society organisations on a number of public law matters.

At Matthew Gold & Co, we are fully equipped to provide the specialist advice required to bring a claim for Judicial Review.

FAQs for Judicial Review

How do you use public law to challenge the decisions of public bodies?

Public bodies routinely make decisions that have a profound effect on the lives of many ordinary people.

For example, the police may retain or disclose personal data, a local authority may decide that a primary school should close or a government department may pass new laws restricting a person’s entitlement to welfare benefits.

Public law, and in particular judicial review, is the legal mechanism for challenging decisions taken by public bodies. It is one of the ways in which a public body can be held to account for its actions. If you or others in your community have been negatively affected by a public body’s decision then it may be possible to challenge that decision by way of “judicial review”.

In an application for judicial review a court will look at the decision made by the public body and decide whether or not that decision was taken lawfully. If the court concludes that the public body’s action was unlawful then there are a range of options available to the court, including ordering that the original decision should be ‘quashed’ and the public body should take the decision again.

Timeframe for bringing a claim for judicial review

If you think you may have a claim for judicial review it is very important that you act quickly.

In general a claim for judicial review must be brought promptly; within six weeks or three months depending on the type of decision being challenged.

Sometimes acting promptly will mean acting very quickly indeed. You should seek immediate legal advice if you are contemplating a judicial review.

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